Doctor who? Future Spartan doctors volunteer at hospitals

At+the+St.+Jude+closing+ceremony+for+the+volunteers%2C+Ahmed+Motiwala+%2812%29+discusses+his+interest+in+neuroscience.+He+also+explained+the+significance+of+neurosurgery+specifically+within+the+pediatric+field.
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Doctor who? Future Spartan doctors volunteer at hospitals

At the St. Jude closing ceremony for the volunteers, Ahmed Motiwala (12) discusses his interest in neuroscience. He also explained the significance of neurosurgery specifically within the pediatric field.

At the St. Jude closing ceremony for the volunteers, Ahmed Motiwala (12) discusses his interest in neuroscience. He also explained the significance of neurosurgery specifically within the pediatric field.

At the St. Jude closing ceremony for the volunteers, Ahmed Motiwala (12) discusses his interest in neuroscience. He also explained the significance of neurosurgery specifically within the pediatric field.

At the St. Jude closing ceremony for the volunteers, Ahmed Motiwala (12) discusses his interest in neuroscience. He also explained the significance of neurosurgery specifically within the pediatric field.

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Local hospitals and White Station High School: what do they have in common? White Station’s students. Over the summer, several Spartans had the distinguished opportunity to volunteer at hospitals in Memphis. 

While other students played games and watched Netflix all summer, these students went above and beyond to give back to the community and take learning into their own hands. Ava Wang (11) and Ahmed Motiwala (12) were able to learn skills that they could have never gained in a classroom setting. 

Motiwala was able to learn how to put in an IV and see the processes before and after surgery. Furthermore, he had the privilege to shadow an anesthesiologist. Working directly under senior medical staff members, they were able to witness the inside happenings of hospitals.

“The most intriguing experience was definitely when I had to watch a stomach surgery because I watched it from start to finish,” Motiwala said. “I watched them prep, I watched them start and I watched them sew [him] up and close [him].”

Motiwala also attributed this experience to his interest in pursuing medicine, specifically neuroscience. 

Wang also got an inside look into the medical field and learned how to use IV bags when she encountered a scary situation. One of the patients ripped her own IV bag out, putting her in danger. Wang was the one to put the IV back in and learned the right procedures.

“It gives me a more hands-on experience for when I want to become a doctor. I will know how hospitals function and things like that,” Wang said.

Wang’s experiences learning from a professional radiologist have helped her decide that she wants to go into radiology in the future. 

Having the opportunity to volunteer at hospitals gave students experiences they will never forget. We can now answer the most important question: Doctor Who? Future doctors here at White Station.

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